When an Itchy Member Comes from a Super Fungus

Yeast infections are often thought of as a women’s issue, but they are also common among men and can definitely be a male organ health concern. In men, this infection is commonly called thrush or candidiasis, and it can make for a very, very itchy member. The term candidiasis comes from candida, which is the fungus that causes this yeast infection. But there are several forms of candida, and in recent years there has emerged a form called a super fungus – and not because it stands for truth, justice and the American way.

Candida auris

The medical name for this particular super fungus is candida auris (sometimes called c. auris). The form of candida most commonly causing an itchy member is candida albicans, and it’s a pain all by itself.

When a guy has “regular” thrush, the yeast has spread across a portion of the manhood. Usually this is the head or, if a man is intact, the prepuce, especially underneath it. A rash typically forms, which is not attractive; but the bigger problem is that thrush itches like crazy. (Sometimes the fungus can also appear in the mouth, where it is even more annoying.)

Although thrush is not considered a socially shared infection, it can be passed through coupling. Often a guy will pick it up from an infected partner (or vice versa) and the two may pass it back and forth for some time. Wearing barrier protection can help cut down on the risk of transmission.

While a pest, regular candida can usually be treated fairly easily with oral or local antifungal medications.

Super fungus

But the super fungus version, candida auris, is not as easy to dismiss as regular thrush. An itchy member is the least of a guy’s concerns here – and indeed, the member is one of the less likely sites for this super fungus to strike. Ears and open wounds are more common targets.

Candida auris was first noticed in 2009, and although it is still rare, it is spreading rapidly. In addition to an itch at the infected site, it is possible for the fungus to enter the bloodstream, which can cause serious and even fatal consequences; more than half of those who reach the blood poisoning phase have died.

Beyond itching, fever and chills are common. The fungus is resistant to many forms of antifungal treatment, although the earlier it is caught, the better the response. People with diabetes have an increased chance of contracting it, as do many people in hospital or nursing home settings – especially those with a central venous catheter or who have recently undergone surgery.

Most men with an itchy member are unlikely to have contracted this super fungus; however, if they also experience fever or chills or have other unusual symptoms, they should check with a doctor to determine if there is anything they should do. Checking with a doctor for regular thrush is not a bad idea, either.

The idea of a super fungus that can turn an itchy member into a serious condition is scary – but again, it is still rare. Instead of fretting, a guy should focus more attention of his overall male organ health by daily using a first rate male organ health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) Manhood skin can be strengthened by a crème that includes a powerful antioxidant like alpha lipoic acid. This can combat excess free radicals and thereby prevent oxidative damage. It also is beneficial if the crème contains vitamin B5, also called pantothenic acid, a vital nutrient required for cell metabolism and the maintenance of healthy tissue.

Visit http://www.menshealthfirst.com for additional information on most common male organ health issues, tips on improving male member sensitivity and what to do to maintain a healthy manhood. John Dugan is a professional writer who specializes in men's health issues and is an ongoing contributing writer to numerous websites.

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