Small member Conundrum: Causes of a “Buried” Member

The size of a man’s male organ is a topic of no small importance to most men, as is widely known. Despite the fact that many men with modest endowments perform like world class champions in bed, there is still a stigma attached to having a small member. Indeed, many men sacrifice sensible male organ health concerns in the quest for a larger member. But some men find themselves with a small member situation that is fairly rare, that of the buried manhood.

A hidden situation
Also called a hidden male organ or a concealed male organ, a buried manhood is an “anomaly in which the male organ is normal in size but appears to be small (i.e., the external genitalia appear small).” In other words, a boy or man has a male organ shaft which is technically of average (or larger) length, but which seems much smaller because a considerable portion of it is buried beneath the skin at the base or sometimes in an enlarged scrotum. When a person is born with this situation, it is considered congenital. If it occurs later in life, it may be referred to as “acquired.”

Congenital buried members are considered very rare. When the condition is acquired, it tends to occur more often later in life, after adolescence and generally more often in senior years.

The degree to which the male organ is buried can vary considerably. In some cases, it is less than an inch, in others several inches. Frequently in cases in which the patient’s foreskin is intact and in which there is a significant amount of the shaft buried, the male organ foreskin may bunch together at the end of the shaft.

Causes
As indicated, in some cases a male is simply born with more of his male organ hidden than usual. In some instances, this may be exacerbated if a child has his sheath removed from too low on the shaft.

In acquired instances, the problem tends to be one related to obesity or to an enlarged scrotum. When obesity is the cause, layers of fat develop in the private area, which essentially engulf the base of the male organ, covering more and more of it as the obesity increases.

When the scrotum is the issue, it usually is due to lymphedema, in which lymph fluid collects in the scrotum, causing it to swell abnormally large and to ‘swallow” the base of the male organ as it does so.

Weight loss is generally recommended for men whose obesity is burying part of their male organ. Treating lymphedema in the scrotum can be challenging and generally involves a combination of specific exercises, bandaging and compression garments.

In some cases, surgery may be recommended to try to correct the engulfment of the male organ. There are several methods which have been employed in this area.

Effects
In extreme cases, buried manhood can be so severe as to prevent a man from performing intimately with another partner. In addition, many boys and men experience severe psychosocial distress from the condition. They may be unwilling to get undressed in front of another person and may also simply be self-conscious about their condition even when clothed.

A buried manhood can be a cause of great concern to a man. But like all men, those with a hidden male organ should still pay attention to their overall male organ health and regularly use a top drawer male organ health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). The best cremes contain a wide range of vitamins – A, B5, C, D, and E – which benefit from their topical application directly to the male organ. It’s best to find a crème that also includes alpha lipoic acid, a powerful antioxidant that fights free radicals and the oxidative damage they can bring.

Visit http://www.menshealthfirst.com for additional information on most common male organ health issues, tips on improving male organ sensitivity and what to do to maintain a healthy male organ. John Dugan is a professional writer who specializes in men's health issues and is an ongoing contributing writer to numerous websites.

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Author: John Dugan