Itchy Member and Manhood Rash: Is Sweat to Blame?

An itchy member can happen for a multitude of reasons, and so can a mild manhood rash. In fact, these can happen so often, and then disappear so quickly, that it becomes commonplace for some men, and they never bother to figure out what might be causing the problem. That’s why they might be so surprised to learn that sweat – simple sweat, from working out or general exertion – can lead to an itchy member and, in some cases, a rather severe manhood rash.

Sweat Makes for an Itchy Member?

Although it might seem strange, an itchy member or manhood rash can result from the sweat a man naturally emits. The sweat itself can be itchy; any man who has felt a drop of sweat run across his forehead is intimately familiar with the need to immediately reach up and scratch or wipe it away. But what happens when that sweat is on or around the male organ? It can lead to the same thing, especially at first. However, when sweat is allowed to rest on the organ and surrounding area, it can lead to an even deeper itch that doesn’t readily go away, even after a man showers.

And what’s more, all that sweat can lead to a rash. Sometimes known as a “sweat rash” or “heat rash,” this manhood rash can be mild and transient, or it can be severe and hang around for a while.

But Why Does Sweat Make It Itchy?

Sweat is a very important way for the body to protect itself. Sweating creates an “air conditioning” for the body, in which the thin coating of moisture helps cool the body down. Waste products come out with the sweat as well, which is nature’s genius way of helping to remove toxins from even the smallest cells in the body. But it can be those very toxins that can make the skin itchy when sweat touches it. To make matters worse, the male organ is usually encased in layers of clothing, which encourages the sweat to linger rather than evaporate. That thin layer of sweat can make the body itch within a short period of time.

Where Sweat Comes From

Sweat comes from sweat glands. These are all over the body, even in the sacks and the male organ. Interestingly enough, there are no sweat glands in the head of the male organ. They are present only in the shaft. However, some men who are intact might notice that the heat of their prepuce can create a greater opportunity for sweat, and that sweat can get trapped against the head of the male organ, thus making it seem as though the head is sweating.

Help the Body Let It Go

One key to stopping the itchy member and manhood rash is to ensure that the sweat has somewhere to go. Here’s how.

1) Shave. Trimmed or shaved hair in the nether regions can help ensure that the sweat doesn’t have hair to hold onto, and thus that can cut down on the odor and itching.

2) Air it out. When sweat leads to a manhood rash, it’s important to let the area dry out entirely. Do this in the most efficient way by simply going all-natural as much as possible when at home.

3) Wear cotton. When choosing underwear, go for cotton, which allows the skin to breathe.

4) Wash daily. A daily washing – at least! – is necessary to keep the skin healthy, to cut down on sweat, and to ensure that a guy feels and smells fresh and clean.

5) Wipe down. If a man has a problem with sweating too much, he can carry sensitive-skin wipes along with him and use them throughout the day to help wipe away some sweat and hopefully avoid a manhood rash.

A Good Male Organ Oil Can Help

The use of a good male organ oil can help soothe the itchy member and might help eradicate the manhood rash, assuming it’s used in conjunction with the good hygiene tips above. An exceptional male organ health oil (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which has been clinically proven mild and safe for skin) should include a powerful moisturizer like shea butter, as well as a variety of excellent vitamins to help the skin, including vitamin A. This is a fantastic ingredient that will help cut down on bacteria that might be found on the itchy member, as well as reduce the male organ odor that can come from sweat bathing the organ during workouts.

Visit http://www.menshealthfirst.com for additional information on most common male organ health issues, tips on improving member sensitivity, and what to do to maintain a healthy manhood. John Dugan is a professional writer who specializes in men’s health issues and is an ongoing contributing writer to numerous websites.

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