8853Choosing a Puppy – Matching Puppy to Personality

My nephew was turning 10 and had wanted a puppy for a long time. His parents decided that a basset hound would make a great family addition. My job, find a basset whose personality would be a good match for my nephew and the family. Choosing a puppy is a huge decision and matching it to the personality of the primary owner is critical. My nephew was a quiet kid, who had a heart as big as a watermelon. I wanted to select a puppy that was similar to him; a puppy that was not aggressive and who loved to be loved on.

After speaking with a few friends, I found an owner of a horse farm whose basset had a litter of puppies and the owners were just starting to look for good homes. Perfect! A drive to the country, playing with a litter of puppies, and being part of the best birthday surprise a 10-year old boy could wish for, now this is living life at its best! It was a beautiful Fall Saturday morning with the clearest blue sky you could image. The horse farm was nestled in a valley in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in Tennessee. As I turned into the entrance of the farm, to my right the staff was busy grooming 4 of their horses and in the distance I could see others grazing in the field. I drove down the gravel drive to the small city of red barns. I was met by the 13-year old daughter of the owner who seemed to be assessing whether or not she was going to allow me to take one of “her” puppies home. As I followed her to one of the stalls, I made a point of looking around to make sure the stalls were clean and well kept. As I turned the corner to go into the stall, there they were, 8 beautiful puppies who were looking for someone to play with. I first just looked them over making sure they appeared healthy, with nice round bellies (although not fat), shiny coats and generally appeared happy. I knelt down and in no time, I was covered in puppies. As I was playing with each pup I was also thinking of my nephew and which one might be best for him. I didn’t want a dog that showed too much assertiveness or dominance. Playful is great, but a puppy who is overbearing with his or her siblings typically is not a good choice. Nearly all the pups were trying to push their way to the front of the pack, stepping over each other jostling for the most attention. But then I saw him. He was setting very near to me, and patiently waiting his turn. He kept looking at me while wagging his tail but didn’t struggle with the rest of the pack. When he saw that I noticed him, he immediately came closer and let me know it was his turn. I picked him up and drew him near. He nuzzled into me and began showering me lots and lots of doggie kisses. If he had reacted by squealing and wriggling and wanting to get down, than this would not have been a good sign. I made a point of doing a complete physical examine by checking his eyes, ears, gums, teeth, paws and legs. Since he gave no objection and actually enjoyed it, I could tell he was use to be handled and touched, which was another good sign. If he had been shy or fearful, that would have been a red flag to look for a different pup. But this little guy was just like my nephew, quiet and full of heart.

My job of selecting a puppy and adding a new member to this family was done. I really didn’t want to leave the pile of puppies, but since Roger (the name we decided to give him) and I found each other, it was time to go home and celebrate the birthday of a 10-year old boy!

To read more about this topic or several other pet care articles and blogs, go to Pet Crates and More at http://www.petcratesandmore.com.  Looking for that perfect puppy pen, puppy supply kit, heated dog bed, or dog crate go to http://www.petcratesandmore.com for some terrific products.  With more than 20 years of management experience, Sandy Stone blended her passion for animals with her business acumen and started, Pet Crates and More, a business offering products aimed at providing comfort for your pets.

 

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